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Copyright The A.A. Grapevine, Inc., June 1944

This is a facsimile of Vol. I, No. 1 —prices, $1.00

   

VOL. I, NO. 1, JUNE, 1944 P. O. BOX 328, GRAND CENTRAL ANNEX YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION, 1.50; COPY, 15c
                                                            May  we  remind  those who see,  read and possess a copy of this paper but who
are not members of A.A. of the meaning of those two initials - - and ask them to
respect our anonymity?   Please do not quote or reprint without our permission.

TWO   YALE   SAVANTS
STRESS   ALCOHOLISM
AS   TRUE   DISEASE




At the launching of
 The Grapevine,  we wish
to
  express our  heartiest congratulations  and
best
 wishes for the success of this new  pub-
lication.
 The  invitation  to  contribute a  note
on the
  Yale Plan Clinics  to  the  first issue  of
your
 Journal,  confirms our belief in the close
relation between
  the  broad  studies  we have
undertaken on all aspects of alcoholism.
The
   first   Yale   Plan   Clinics,   which  are  at
New Haven
 and  Hartford,  were  established
by the Laboratory
  of  Applied Physiology of
Yale University
 in cooperation with the  Con-
necticut
  Prison  Association.   This  most  re-
cent
 venture  does not stand by itself,  but is
closely
   integrated  with  the  researches  and
educational
   activities   of   the    Laboratory.
These
    three   activities   represent   a   broad
scheme
  in  which  rehabilitation  of  the  alco-
holic
   and   the  prevention   of   inebriety  are
equal
  goals.
The
  Clinics  serve  several  purposes and it is
hard
  to  say  which  purpose  ranks  first.   As
long
 as  the  general  public  is  not  aware  of
the fact that alcoholism is a disease,
 the most
important
  object  of  the  Clinics  is to  spread
this
  idea  until  it  is  fully  accepted.   For  the
time
  being,  this  object may be placed ahead
of
the guidance of alcoholics. Another object
is
  to  further  the  development of community
resources
  which  could  be  utilized  in the re-
habilitation
   of   alcoholics.   At   present,   in
many
  cases  therapy  must  be  undertaken at
the
 Clinics  because  of  the  scarcity of other
resources.
   But   when   those  facilities  shall
have  been
  developed,   based,   perhaps,  on
recommendations coming from the experience

of   the   Clinics,    the    latter    will   limit   their
activity   solely   to  the  guiding  of  alcoholics
to  those   facilities  which   according  to  diag-
nosis  seem  to  be  the  most  promising in  the
individual  case.  Such guidance is being  prac-
ticed  at   present  at   the  Clinics   in   bringing
suitable   cases   into  contact   with   the   local
groups  of   Alcoholics   Anonymous.   It  goes
without  saying  that  one  of  our objectives  is
to  further   interest  and  confidence  in   Alco-
holics Anonymous among those who have not
heard  of  it  or who are inadequately  informed.
The  contacts  of  the  Clinics  with  the  courts,
with   various   departments  of   State  govern-
ment  and  with  civic  agencies  will  contribute
greatly  to bring  about  adequate  understand-
ing of  the nature of alcoholism,  of  the  utiliza-
tion  of  the  existing, and  the  development  of
needed,  facilities.
The  Clinics  in  giving   physical  examinations
to  all  alcoholics  who  come  for  advice  bring
to their  attention  physical  ailments  which  all
too  frequently  are  neglected.   The  treatment
of  such ailments does  not lie within the activi-
ties  of   the  Clinics,   but  the  Clinics  facilitate
contacts  with  hospitals or  private  practition-
ers.
The  Clinics  have  been  in operation only  two
months  and  thus a  report  on "results" is  not
justified.  It  is,  however,  worth reporting  that
out  of   70  alcoholics   who  up  to  date   have
availed   themselves  of   the  Clinics,  22   have
come   without   being   "referred,"   but   solely
from   their   own   desire   for    help.    The   re-
mainder  have been  sent by  their relatives,  by
the   courts,   social   agencies,   hospitals,  and
private  practitioners.   Local  groups  of  Alco-
holics  Anonymous have sent  four  men either
for  diagnosis of  nervous complications or  for
physical    examination.    Numerous    inquiries
have  been  recieved   from  court  officers  and
municipal     administrators     throughout     the
country  concerning   the  feasibility  of  estab-
lishing clinics  in other cities.  The  indications
are  that   there  is  a  wide  interest  in   the  re-
habilitation  of  alcoholics and that only direc-
tion is needed to give it full display.
The  problem  of  the  alcoholic  is  to great  to
be solved  by any  one person or even by any
one  organization.  The cooperation  of  all  in-
dividuals   and   all   organizations,   based  on
mutual   respect  and   understanding  of  each
other's aims, is needed to bring success to the
efforts of all those who are interested in bring-
ing   back  the  alcoholic  into  the  life  of   the
community.
New  Haven,  Connecticut
Howard W. Haggard  
E. M. Jellinek              

"GRAPEVINE"  IN  BOW
           
In  a   big  smoke-filled   room  six   ink-stained
wretches sipped at their Cokes as I shot ques-
tion after question at them.
"All  right,"  I  said,  "The  stork  didn't   bring
this paper.  Nobody  found  it  in a  rose bush.
It  didn't  just  grow  like  Topsy.  Come  clean,
now.   How'd   it  all  begin?"   "Well,"  the  six
began,  "It was just something that was in the
air.   Everybody,  at  some  time  or  other,  has
had  the bright idea:  let's have an A.A. paper!
Then–bang–Cleveland  had one;  so why  not
us, here in the Metropolitan area?  We figured
to  take the paper out of  the talking stage and
put  it  into print."  With  that  the six  shut up.
In  the  silence  that  followed  I  looked  these
people   over.   Very   average.   A  cashier;   a
radio  script  writer;  an  author;  a  bookseller;
an  art  director;   a  wife  and  mother  of   two.
"Do  you  realize,"   I  said,   "that  you  people
are sticking  your  necks out to here?  Starting
a  paper up all  by  your  little selves.  Not put-
ting  it  to a  vote and  all  that  kind of  thing."

(Continued on page 8)

Copyright The A.A. Grapevine, Inc., June 1944
In practicing our Traditions, The AA Grapevine, Inc. has neither endorsed nor are they affiliated with Silkworth.net.
The Grapevine®, and AA Grapevine® are registered trademarks of The AA Grapevine, Inc.

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